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A Conversation with Amy
Posted by Amy Saunder
What is your favorite role to dance and why?
My favorite ballets to perform are Petipa's Swan Lake and Balanchine's Rubies. I love Swan Lake because the music is beautifully heart breaking and the emotion, especially in act II, is so powerful, yet so vulnerable. In contrast, the soloist in Rubies is flirty and fun and every step is a perfect reflection of the music. 

What do you like to do when you are not dancing?
I love to cook, hike, and travel to new places.  

How do you prepare yourself for the physical challenges of rehearsing, performing, touring?
I find that yoga helps prepare me physically and mentally for these challenges. It keeps my mind in a good place and helps me to connect to my body while simultaneously stretching and strengthening my limbs and core. 

What music do you like to listen to when you warm-up?
The music I listen to varies depending on what mood I'm in but I tend to gravitate toward happy music with a nice beat. Right now I can't get enough of Fleetwood Mac. 

What do you think is the most common myth about being a ballerina? What do you wish people knew about what it's really like to be a ballerina?
People tend to think ballerinas can't do contemporary or that they don't need to know how. I think being grounded is a very important asset to the ballet technique and that contemporary dance can help ballerinas explore different ways of connecting to the floor and connecting to their own body's movement. To me, ballet and contemporary have an ever growing symbiotic relationship.

I wish people knew how hard it is to be in a constant search for perfection when perfection doesn't really exist. Ballet never gets easier and there will always be that lingering desire to be better, stronger, more ethereal, etc. 

Do you feel an affinity for any particular choreographer?
Although I've never performed his work, I am very drawn to Ma Cong's choreography. The fluidity and artistry of his movement is so beautiful and it translates so well into his choreography. 

What is the biggest reward in your career?
The moment when I can absorb myself in a role and completely let go on stage is the biggest reward for me. This doesn't happen every single time I perform but when it does happen the feeling is euphoric. I also really love rehearsing in the studio because I can go even further with my movement and it's always rewarding to challenge what I think my limits are.

Read more about Amy at www.suzannefarrell.org

A Conversation with Miriam
Posted by Miriam Ernest
What is your favorite role to dance and why?

I love Balanchine’s Serenade. The music is beautiful, and dancing in the corps de ballet of any Balanchine ballet is gratifying. My dream role is Juliet. I would love to dance to that Prokofiev score and make the movement and the story speak to and reach an audience.

What do you like to do when you are not dancing?

I love hot yoga—it helps me to stay balanced, mentally and physically. I also read, write, hang out with friends, and play the piano.

How do you prepare yourself for the physical challenges of rehearsing, performing, touring?

I cross train to ensure my body is as strong and as balanced as it can be, eat healthy foods, and make sure I get an adequate amount of sleep.

What is it like to work with Ms. Farrell? Any fun and memorable stories or anecdotes about working with her?

Working with Ms. Farrell is incredibly fulfilling. She is a beautiful person and gives so much of herself in classes and rehearsals. She has an innate sense of musicality and passion for dance that she shares with all of us. She often says, "We know what we can do, but we do not know all that we can do." I leave each season feeling inspired and remembering why I love to dance.

What music do you like to listen to when you warm-up?

I don’t always listen to music before class, but when I do, it is usually upbeat and ranges from classical to more alternative. I love Bach and Dvorak and also Owl City, Marina and the Diamonds, and Tune-Yards. If there is a piece in the repertoire that has a challenging score of music, I often listen to it while working out or during my down time to gain familiarity with it.

What do you think is the most common myth about being a ballerina? What do you wish people knew about what it’s really like to be a ballerina?

I think people don’t realize how demanding ballet is, mentally and physically. It is extremely athletic and takes so much coordination and strength. Dance is such a beautiful art form, and dancers are so committed to their work. I wish more people could see ballet and truly be inspired by it.

Do you feel an affinity for any particular choreographer?

I definitely feel an affinity for Balanchine. His choreography is timeless and so musical. I also admire Alonzo King and his approach to dance and life. I love contemporary movement and value the time I have spent working with Andrew Bartee. He is such a kind, creative, and inspiring person, and I find so much to express through his movement.

What is the biggest reward in your career?

This career is short, and I really try to enjoy the time that I am given to dance. Ballet has given me opportunities to travel and make incredible friends across the country. I love to move and perform. But most of all, I want to be a light in the dance world and the world in general. I firmly believe that dance can be selfless and giving and that there is something deeper to express through this art form. If I can inspire someone that I work with or an audience member, that is the ultimate reward.

Miriam Ernest in Agon. Photo by Linda Spillers.

Read more about Miriam at www.suzannefarrell.org

A Conversation with Bethany
Posted by Bethany Lowrie
What is your favorite role to dance and why?
There are many ballets I have yet to experience and I am still waiting to discover my favorite role. Each ballet is unique and special and I enjoy each of the roles given. As of right now, I would love to dance the lead role in Balanchine's Mozartiana and Kitri in Don Quixote.
 
What do you like to do when you are not dancing?
When not dancing, I enjoy hand embroidery and sewing. Cooking has also become an interest over the past couple of years and I also enjoy sipping tea and reading books.

How do you prepare yourself for the physical challenges of rehearsing, performing, touring?
I try to stick to my normal routines as much as possible. It can be hard because schedules sometimes change to accommodate theater rehearsals and performances, but I find I am both mentally and physically more relaxed and prepared when I treat it as an average day. For me this means staying as close as possible to my normal eating and sleeping routines, and making sure I properly stretch out and warm up.

What is it like to work with Ms. Farrell? Any fun and memorable stories or anecdotes about working with her?
It is an honor, a privilege, and a joy to work with Ms. Farrell. She is such an inspiring person and often pushes me beyond what I thought was my very best work without me even realizing it. Coming home and going back to ballet classes always proves to be an eye-opening experience as I realize how much I have grown by working with Ms. Farrell. Ms. Farrell cares deeply for each of her dancers and I completely trust her judgment in classes, rehearsals, and performances. Her memory and knowledge of Mr. Balanchine's ballets and his technique continues to amaze me and I look forward to learning more from her this season.

What music do you like to listen to when you warm-up?
I enjoy quite a variety of music and I mix it up depending on my daily preference. Inspirational music is the most common choice although I also listen to Country, Classical and Sound Track.

What do you think is the most common myth about being a ballet dancer? What do you wish people knew about what it's really like to be a ballet dancer?
I believe many people underestimate the hard work and discipline of ballet. Ballet dancers are often acquainted with tutus and tiaras, lean figures, and performing. What goes unnoticed is the fact that we work on the same steps and rehearse the same ballets almost every day for weeks at a time to create the lines, movements, and gestures seen onstage. We must also train our minds to quickly pick up all of the choreography given to us, since we often learn more then one ballet at a time.

Do you feel an affinity for any particular choreographer?
I absolutely love Balanchine's choreography. His choreography is brilliant and beautiful. The vast range of his pieces from soft and elegant to sharp and unique is marvelous and I am continually impressed with the precision, strength, and especially the musicality present in all of them. While the counts in the music can be challenging to learn at first, exploring the music is an enlightening experience and very rewarding once understood.

What is the biggest reward in your career?
For me the biggest reward in ballet is the performances. In performances, dancers possess the ability to draw the audience completely into the world of whatever ballet being danced, through lines, movement and motions. In this way, we are able to draw people away from reality and into another world, giving them respite from their daily lives and allowing them to walk away with a fresh perspective on reality.

 

A Conversation with Melanie
Posted by Melanie Riffee
What is your favorite role to dance and why?
As cliché as it may sound, every new role that I take on becomes a favorite in the moment.  I think it's the process of reading into each character, era, or role that really makes you feel this current role is who you are.  I'm not sure if it's possible to choose just one favorite, because I have loved so many roles that I have had the opportunity to dance!  Then of course there are always so many dream roles...for me a few are Juliet, Balanchine's Chaconne,, and Waltz girl in Serenade.

What do you like to do when you are not dancing?
Outside of spending time with loved ones and friends, I am typically exploring other art forms of expression.  I have always loved writing, curling up with a good book, painting, sketching, photography, scrapbooking and other spontaneous art projects, as well as visiting museums and galleries.  I'm also working towards my English degree from Northeastern University, so I get to spend time exploring quite a bit of great literature.

How do you prepare yourself for the physical challenges of rehearsing, performing, touring?
I think the mental preparation plays an equally important role in being physically prepared for these challenges.  Having the mind focused in a positive light sets every rehearsal and performance day up for great possibility.  Physically, there is a lot of strength-building conditioning and cross training involved, and also just knowing your body's strengths, weaknesses, and needs can really help in preparing for the day-to-day physical challenges.  As far as touring goes, it's all about defeating the jet lag and keeping the body and mind focused while absorbing all of the incredible new experiences around you...and always remembering to take your vitamins!

What is it like to work with Ms. Farrell? 
She is an inspiration.  Whether it is exploring from within the studio or in the outside world, Ms. Farrell always finds a way to discover the beauty and artistic value that everything in life has to offer.  She pushes the boundaries of the mind just as much as the body, but always manages to leave you feeling enriched, enlightened, and with a smile on your face!

What music do you like to listen to when you warm-up?
The biggest variety...my iPod sounds like it could belong to 15 very different people.  I don't always listen to music while warming up in the mornings, but before shows I definitely have some playlists with enough of a blend to get pumped up and relaxed, without riling the nerves. ;)

What do you think is the most common myth about being a ballerina? What do you wish people knew about what it's really like to be a ballerina?
Well as of lately, that all ballerinas must be as crazy as the movie Black Swan portrays. Prior to that, the general assumption was that we spend all day prancing around on our toes in tutus to Fantasia-like music while eating nothing and waving a magic wand.  In case you're still skeptical, this is not true.  In regards to sanity, I really believe dancers are some of the most perceptive, intelligent, and focused individuals-it would be impossible to be in such an intricate, demanding and discipline-based art form otherwise.  Though I do wish people knew just how much goes into building this career!

Do you feel an affinity for any particular choreographer?
I would have to say, Balanchine.  The energy, the attack, his musicality...it's infectious!  There is just so much to take in during a Balanchine ballet; even the slightest movement, pattern and accent change happens with such purpose that it leaves both the dancers and the audience breathless.  One of my favorite things is the way Balanchine could highlight several different instruments at once within an orchestration of the same phrase of music, all by choreographing multiple sequences for groups of dancers to be simultaneously performed.  In this way, he makes every single performance such an exhilarating challenge.  I think he always leaves the audience wanting more, and the dancers wishing they could just keep going!

What is the biggest reward in your career?
Performing-it really is a gift.  From the moment the curtain goes up, that divider between audience and stage is taken away and you can just feel the two worlds mesh together.  There is nothing comparable to the freedom you have as a performer onstage, or to the way it feels having given everything you possibly could to the audience.  Just knowing you have the opportunity to make even one person really feel something from your performance, and to share this art form with the world is an incredible reward.

Read more about Melanie at www.suzannefarrell.org

A Conversation with Paola
Posted by Soloist Paola Hartley
What do you like to do when you are not dancing?
I love to crochet! I have made blankets, scarves, cushions, and shawls. I brings me so much joy. I also enjoy spending time with my fiancé and our dogs.

How do you prepare yourself for the physical challenges of rehearsing, performing, touring?
I always make it a point to get enough sleep! And, to eat well for energy. Epsom salt baths and ice buckets are a must.

What is it like to work with Ms. Farrell? Any fun and memorable stories or anecdotes about working with her?
It has been such a pleasure and a true learning experience working with Ms. Farrell. It is very exciting when she shares stories of her work with Mr. Balanchine.

Anecdote: My birthday fell on my first week of work with The Suzanne Farrell Ballet. Somehow Ms. Farrell knew it was my birthday and during barre, she created a tendú combination where no other music but the "Happy Birthday" song would work. When I realized what I was hearing I couldn't contain the emotion and started crying. It was very special and I appreciated her thoughtfulness.

What music do you like to listen to when you warm-up?
I have never gotten into the swing of listening to music while warming up. I much rather chat with my colleagues!

What do you think is the most common myth about being a ballet dancer? What do you wish people knew about what it's really like to be a ballet dancer?
The most common myth that I can think of is that we don't eat. When in reality we need all of the energy that we can get. I wish people knew more that this is really a vocation. We live and breathe ballet all over.

Do you feel an affinity for any particular choreographer?
Definitely Mr. Balanchine. I feel challenged, pushed but at the same time free and happy to be onstage.

What is the biggest reward in your career?
What has satisfied me the most out of all of my years dancing has been the opportunity to reach out to the audience and give them a nice night out where they can forget their problems and daily life issues for a couple of hours. To receive their applause is my biggest reward.

Paola Hartley in Tempo di Valse Photo by Linda Spillers.
A Conversation with Jesse
Posted by Jesse Campbell
What is your favorite role to dance and why?
My favorite role is Romeo from Romeo and Juliet. The depth and honesty of the character is compelling. The dancing is stunning from both an artistic and athletic perspective. 

What do you like to do when you are not dancing?
I enjoy anything to do with the outdoors. I grew up spending a lot of time in the mountains so I'm always interested in an adventure involving camping, hiking, kayaking, etc. 

How do you prepare yourself for the physical challenges of rehearsing, performing, touring?
I have to make sure I get enough sleep beforehand. It seems simple enough but it can be challenging with a busy schedule! Cross-training is also important when gearing up to have greater stamina when on tour.

What is it like to work with Ms. Farrell? Any fun and memorable stories or anecdotes about working with her?
Ms. Farrell constantly challenges dancers to excel beyond what they thought was possible in their dancing. It is an incredible experience to receive her coaching and her insight, particularly to George Balanchine's work.

What music do you like to listen to when you warm-up?
It depends on the situation. Before class I like listening to electronic music to get my energy going and before a performance I like to listen to the genre of the music that I'll be dancing to, which is generally something of a classical nature. 

What do you think is the most common myth about being a ballet dancer? What do you wish people knew about what it's really like to be a ballet dancer?
I think the biggest myth about being a ballet dancer has to deal with how easy it looks. While making the steps look easy is one of the objectives of the art form, it's important to know that there are countless hours of hard work involved in the quest for the technique to look effortless and for freedom in the movement. 

Do you feel an affinity for any particular choreographer?
I am always excited to perform choreography by George Balanchine. I especially enjoy experiencing his sense of musicality when performing his work. 

What is the biggest reward in your career?
The biggest reward of dancing is the opportunity to perform! Being onstage is truly a phenomenal sensation. Feeling the energy of the audience and allowing the music and movement to speak through my body is an experience unlike any other.

Photo by Josephine Cardin.

Read more about Jesse at www.suzannefarrell.org

A Conversation with Violeta
Posted by Soloist Violeta Angelova
What is your favorite role to dance and why?
I don't have a favorite role, but I very much enjoy when a ballet has you dancing on a feeling or when you have the chance to build a character.

What do you like to do when you are not dancing?
Usually something else connected to the arts. Also I love nature and I try to get back to it! TV sometimes gets in the way of that.

How do you prepare yourself for the physical challenges of rehearsing, performing, touring?

I train. Besides ballet class I do my own exercises. For performing, I prepare myself by rehearsing. As for how I prepare for touring, well let's face it - no matter how much you prepare, it's always exhausting.

What is it like to work with Ms. Farrell? Any fun and memorable stories or anecdotes about working with her?
Dancing in Ms. Farrell's company opened new horizons for me. She is one of the nicest people to work with. Rehearsals with her are always productive, she knows the ballets inside and out, and she tells the most amazing stories. Sometimes I wish we could have more time together.

There are lots of little fun moments to recall. Here is one: A little while back I wore a different leotard every day for two or three weeks, but it was really such a routine I did not even realize I was doing it. One day Ms. Farrell looked at me and asked if I had a leotard shop! She notices everything!

What music do you like to listen to when you warm-up?

I listen to music more when going to the theater than when warming-up. It's either an all-genre hits list or classical music.

What do you think is the most common myth about being a ballerina? What do you wish people knew about what it's really like to be a ballerina?

I'd say the most common myth is that we all have ugly toes. I was talking to a bank manager once and he told me he knew more about ballet than most people. He followed that with "I know how your toes look." "No, you don't," I replied. I was irritated.

Do you feel an affinity for any particular choreographer?

I don't think I will be able to answer properly until I'm fifty years old and have retired from dancing onstage.

What is the biggest reward in your career?

Probably inspiring children to try and learn about ballet as well as representing Bulgaria around the world.

Read more about Violeta at www.suzannefarrell.org

A Conversation with Elisa
Posted by First Soloist Elisabeth Holowchuk
What has been your favorite role to dance and why?

I find that whatever I am working on at the moment becomes my favorite. I like ballets that challenge me. The challenge can be the process of finding how to make the steps work for my body, or perhaps adopting a persona that is not my own in real life. In that respect, I had a lot of fun dancing "The Strip Tease Girl" in Slaughter on Tenth Avenue. In real life I am very shy and could never let my hair down or "strut my stuff" like that. I think it's wonderful that ballet affords dancers the chance to be different than they feel they are. What happens on stage almost becomes more real than what happens off stage because I don't feel hindered or limited by the outside world when I am dancing. Similarly, I also found working on the "Unanswered Question" section of the ballet Ivesiana a challenge in that I had to face one of my fears. The stage is pitch black, except for a spotlight. I spend the entirety of the ballet carried by four men. They hold me above their heads and I stand and walk on their shoulders in the dark. While I am not particularly fond of heights, I am afraid of the dark! The juxtaposition of the somewhat anxious, unsettling music and the calmness that I am supposed to portray was a great way to work through those fears. I learned to trust my partners and know that even though I couldn't see them they were there to support and carry me. It was a great lesson in having faith in something that you can't necessarily see with your eyes.

How do you prepare yourself for the physical challenges of dancing ballet?

I have a series of pilates exerices that I perform daily before class in the morning. I need to activate my abdominal muscles and I do a little stretching prior to the start of the day. I tape my toes with masking tape before putting on my pointe shoes to avoid getting blisters. At the end of the day I do a technique called Yamuna Body Rolling. Basically, you roll along and perform a series of movements on a ball and this helps relieve stress and tension in the muscles. It's like have deep tissue work performed but you get to control the depth and intensity of the massage.

Mentally, I try to clear my head in the morning before the rehearsal day. Sometimes I go over choreography, especially the sections that give me trouble. I try to visualize myself performing the step correctly. I'm a "glass half empty" kind of girl, so it's just as important for me to think positively to prepare my mind as it is to prepare my body.

What has it been like to work with Ms. Farrell?

I was fortunate to come through Ms. Farrell's Exploring Ballet program, so I have been able to work with her for many years now, even prior to being in the company. I remember her telling all of us in her summer program that we become the most important people in her life while we would be working with her. Having been her student and now one of her dancers, I truly believe that statement! She is the most supportive artistic director. I like the fact that she is present in the studio all day everyday when we are working. She teaches class, runs rehearsal and stages the ballets. You can tell that she values each of her dancers and the unique gifts that each of us brings to the company. We work as a team, but more importantly, a team of individuals.

The Suzanne Farrell Ballet also participates in the Balanchine Preservation Initiative and this project has provided a whole new aspect to working with Ms. Farrell for me. I have had the honor to perform several of the roles created for her that were previously "lost." Learning the ballets from her and through her experiences has been an amazing gift.

What do you like to do when you're not dancing?

I really like to draw. My mom used to drive me back and forth to New York City from our home in New Jersey for ballet class, and I would sit in the car and sketch for the entire ride. I've turned some of my drawings and ideas into a business endeavor- I now own my own design company called Stylish Ink. I have a website that I designed and created myself that showcases and enables me to sell greeting cards, stationery, t-shirts and lots of other products, most of which have a ballet theme. I have a great time dreaming up new designs and ideas for products and then implementing them on the site. I even enjoy printing out coupons to send to customers, creating ad campaigns and taking orders to the post office. It's important to me to have a creative outlet, while inspired and tied to my life as a dancer, but also completely "other" at the same time.

What do you think is the most common myth about being a ballerina?

It's not exactly a myth, but I think most people would be surprised at how versatile dancers are. Many of my friends and colleagues pursue all kinds of careers outside of dance. I know many dancers who are Pilates instructors, yoga teachers, massage therapists, photographers, actors, directors, screen writers, make up artists, costume designers, columnists, authors, interior designers, models, painters, musicians… the list goes on! We really are a creative group of people.

What is the biggest reward in your career?

I love the sense of legacy and personal interaction involved in dance. You really can't do this on your own. You can't read a book and figure out how to become a ballet dancer. It takes someone (or many people) who have come before you and who pass on their knowledge to you in order to understand ballet. If all the dancers who came before me hadn't accomplished what they have done, I wouldn't be here doing what I am doing now. You take what you have learned from those individuals and you transform it into your own art. Then, at the end of all of that, you get the chance, and the honor, to pass it along to the next generation of dancers.

Read more about Elisabeth at www.suzannefarrell.org

Elisabeth Holowchuk and Kirk Henning in Danses Cancertantes. Photo by Rosalie O'Connor.

A Conversation with Natalia
Posted by Principal dancer Natalia Magnicaballi
What is your favorite role to dance and why?

It’s a little hard for me to mention just one particular role… I really like to dance and every time I do it I try to make every ballet my own. I think that’s why I like dancing so much.

What do you like to do when you are not dancing?

I love to spend time with my husband, travel with him to new places and watch a lot of movies.

How do you prepare yourself for the physical challenges of rehearsing, performing, touring?

I’ve been performing and touring since a very young age, so that regimen has been pretty much a part of my life. I believe it is essential to train, eat right and get enough sleep, so your body and mind can function well, because what we do requires a lot of discipline and constant focus.

What is it like to work with Ms. Farrell? Any fun and memorable stories or anecdotes about working with her?

I have been working with Ms. Farrell from the inception of her company. For me, working with her is super inspiring. She gives me a lot of freedom and every time I’m on stage it’s a very pleasurable experience.

As an anecdote, I will never forget that during my first tour with the company I didn’t speak English yet, so I couldn’t communicate with anybody. Ms. Farrell was very nice to me, making sure every day that I was okay. Among other things, at the end of the tour we were in NYC on the New Victory Theatre’s stage and she toasted me and said she was very happy with my work on that tour and proud that I had made it through with no English. That gesture made my day very happy.

What music do you like to listen to when you warm-up?

I don’t listen to music when I’m warming up; I like to be in silence. For me, that’s the moment when I connect with myself before my day starts.

What do you think is the most common myth about being a ballerina? What do you wish people knew about what it’s really like to be a ballerina?

I don’t know if this is the most common myth, but a lot of people think that ballerinas are very fragile for what we portray on stage (Maybe this is because it is our job to make everything look effortless and easy when actually it is not). I believe we are really tough. Sometimes people don’t realize how much dedication and discipline we put into what we do, how many hours we spend working in the studios, etc. When I tell people who are not very familiar with ballet that we work at least eight hours a day, training and rehearsing in the studio, they usually seem very surprised.

Do you feel an affinity for any particular choreographer?

I love to dance Mr. Balanchine’s ballets; my body feels somehow at home. His ballets are so diverse one to the other, plus so challenging physically and mentally, that you feel you are in different worlds when you are dancing them. He really was a genius!

What is the biggest reward in your career?

If I have to think of rewards in my career, I would say that being able to inspire or move others with my dancing is probably the biggest one. Having people from the audience coming backstage after every performance and sending letters and emails to share how inspirational or touching my dancing was for them, is very rewarding for me as an artist.

Read more about Natalia at www.suzannefarrell.org

Natalia Magnicaballi in Tzigane Photo by Paul Kolnik.
Mark your Calendar for our 2014/2015 Season
Posted by Administrator

Nothing compares to a live performance, so it is with great anticipation that The Suzanne Farrell Ballet officially opens the Kennedy Center ballet season at the Opera House over the Thanksgiving weekend. Our program, which will feature three company premieres and the return of one of Balanchine's greatest ballets, promises to be a visual feast.

Balanchine’s Swan Lake is the very essence of Act 2, while he once said that his tour de force Allegro Brillante"contains everything I know about classical ballet in 13 minutes." And his combined "white ballets"Monumentum Pro Gesualdo/Movements for Piano and Orchestra are the pure distillation of Balanchine's collaboration with Igor Stravinsky. The program will end with Jerome Robbins's delightfully witty The Concert (or The Perils of Everybody), which will send you out into the night laughing and content.

Florida State University Residency
Tallahassee, FL
October 27 - November 7, 2014

The Kennedy Center, Opera House
with The Kennedy Center Opera House Orchestra Washington, DC
November 28-30, 2014
Swan Lake* (Tchaikovsky/Balanchine) 
Monumentum Pro Gesualdo/Movements for Piano and Orchestra (Stravinsky/Balanchine) 
Allegro Brillante* (Tchaikovsky/Balanchine) 
The Concert (or, The Perils of Everybody)* (Chopin/Robbins) 
*Company Premieres

And join us on tour!
University of Minnesota, Northrop Theater
with live orchestra Minneapolis, MN
Thursday, December 4, 2014
Swan Lake (Tchaikovsky/Balanchine) 
Allegro Brillante (Tchaikovsky/Balanchine) 
The Concert (or, The Perils of Everybody) (Chopin/Robbins)

Purchase College, Concert Hall 
Purchase, NY 
Sunday, December 7, 2014
Swan Lake (Tchaikovsky/Balanchine) 
Allegro Brillante (Tchaikovsky/Balanchine)
Agon (Stravinsky/Balanchine)

Lied Center for Performing Arts 
Lincoln, NE 
Saturday, February 14, 2015
In residence February 9 -14, 2015
Swan Lake (Tchaikovsky/Balanchine) 
Allegro Brillante (Tchaikovsky/Balanchine)
Agon (Stravinsky/Balanchine)

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